Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: DIY Felt Play Food Tutorial – Lussekatter for St. Lucia’s Day

A few years ago, Scandinavian-American blogger Linnea wrote a lovely overview of the Swedish holiday known as St. Lucia Day, and she’s back today with a tutorial for the most darling little felt lussekatter (Swedish saffron bun) toys!  When Aveline was the same age as Linnea’s adorable little, projects like this were very popular in our house. The supplies needed are so minimal — felt, needle and thread, polyfill — but just look at how captivated babies are with the final product! Beyond cute. 

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter

DIY Felt Play Food Tutorial – Lussekatter for St. Lucia’s Day

by Linnea Farnsworth

I’m so excited to have had a little girl of my own to be a Lucia in our home! I’ve always thought that felt play food is so darling and fun, so this year I made some felt Lucia buns for her to play with.

I got a few sheets of the golden felt at Michaels, it is a perfect color. Other things you need are thread, embroidery floss in a matching color, and some batting to stuff the insides. If your Lucia is older you could put some dark beads or buttons on to be raisins (they are a bit of a choking hazard for my little Lucia, though!)

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Start with a piece 3″x9″. My felt sheets were 9″x12″, so I could get 4 buns from each sheet.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Fold the piece in half and pin. Sew along the long edge and one short edge, leaving a 3/8″ seam allowance.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Clip the corner – this make it easier to flip the corner right side out again.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Turn your tube right side out and stuff it. You want it to be stuffed firmly, but not overstuffed – it needs to have some give so we can roll up the edges.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Stitch the open end closed.

Now we are going to roll the felt much like we would the dough in real life. I found it easiest to roll down the edge just a little first, and anchor that with a few stitches. Here I used 3 strands of embroidery floss because it was a bit stronger and required less stitches.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

After that is secured, roll it down a little further and anchor with a few more stitches.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Do the same to the other side, only roll it the opposite direction for a traditionally shaped Lucia bun.

Sew on any buttons or beads for raisins if you are adding them, and you’re done! If you’d like you can experiment and make other fancy shapes with your Lucia “dough.”

Glad Lucia!
DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog
DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog


Linnea Farnsworth is a self-described Scandihoovian, a Washington DC-area photographer, and mom to the cutest little sweet pea. Linnea has also shared previously about her Swedish heritage on both the Scandinavian Christmas and Midsommar blog series — Sankta Lucia Day and Linnea’s Swedish Midsommar Celebration. (She really throws the best mid-summer parties, you guys.) Don’t forget to follow her on Instagram at @linneaanne!

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Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: Jul, Lagerhaus Style

GOD_JUL

Like GRANIT, the Swedish retailer I posted about earlier this season, this next retailer hails from Sverige, too. Lagerhaus has a lovely line of home goods — and their Jul collection is just so pretty! I’d leave out the gold-dipped mugs all year round — and the numbered tags make creating a set of your own weekly advent candles so, so easy.

Scandinavian Christmas styled by Lagerhaus Sweden

Scandinavian Christmas styled by Lagerhaus Sweden

Scandinavian Christmas styled by Lagerhaus Sweden

Scandinavian Christmas styled by Lagerhaus Sweden

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Gold mug // mugg guld 

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Christmas matches // jul tändstickor

Chocolate / Chokladkaka

Chocolate / Chokladkaka

Chocolate advent calendar / Chokladkalender

Chocolate advent calendar / Chokladkalender

Numbers for each week of Advent / Nummerbrickor

Numbers for each week of Advent / Nummerbrickor

Want more tidings of jul cheer? Browse the entire Scandinavian Christmas seriees on Oaxacaborn.com, or see more from Lagerhaus’ Christmas collection.

Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: Fika

First of all, let’s get one thing straight. Fika is essential. How else could you get through the daily slump, the brick wall, the sleepies, if not for elevensies, fika, coffee with sweets?

fika_london

Fika London, that most…design-y…of all coffee houses, gets it right with this one. (Who wants to be a dull horse?)

FIKA London, kannelbullens on a Donna Wilson plate with glass of milkAnd okay, they kinda nailed it with this one, too. Swedish kannelbullen, er, cinnamon buns, anyone?

fika_cheese
Fika is never consumed on the run. It’s about stopping to breathe, and recharge. [image via the Kitchn]

97aaf1d2ea96a693e74e4eca28a825a2Swedish coffee isn’t served strong, but light and thin, so you can keep on pouring refills all [long, dark] afternoon long. (image via DimeStoreVintage on Etsy)

Just don’t add egg to mine, thanks ;))

Herz Allerliebst - Coffee and Star Anise and Cinnamon and Stars
And it isn’t just coffee alone. It’s coffee + sweets. Maybe you’ll have some spiced coffee with tiny ginger stars? (Image by Herz Allerliebst, via Nadine on Flickr)

9_lagerhaus_jul_sverige
Or maybe coffee in the prettiest enamelware (via Lagerhaus.se), and more gingerbread stars.

fika_red_enamelwareMore kannelbullen — and more enamelware, which to me is so quintessentially a part of the whole fika experience. (Image via What’s for Lunch, Honey?; Swedish kannelbullen recipe via Craft and Creativity.)

Even though it’s fast approaching the busiest time of the year, how did YOU pause for fika today?

ESPRESSO
[image via The Faux Martha; Salted Nutella Latte]

Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: GRANIT and a little Swedish cabin

Oh, skandinavisk jul! (Yes, I have an obsession. But that’s okay, because that’s what this series is all about).  So let’s get the fifth annual Scandinavian Christmas series rolling!

Granit_advent

Every winter in October — yep, not autumn, winter — Swedish  decor (and clothing, and gardening) chain GRANIT unveils their Christmas collection. And you can just feel that arctic afternoon darkness, folding over the cabin like a wool blanket, while the cardamom and anise wash over you.

Skandinavisk Jul! Styling by Swedish interiors and gardening store GRANIT

Skandinavisk Jul! Styling by Swedish interiors and gardening store GRANIT

Skandinavisk Jul! Styling by Swedish interiors and gardening store GRANIT

GRANIT_bulbs

Skandinavisk Jul! Styling by Swedish interiors and gardening store GRANIT

Want more from GRANIT? I love their Pinterest board that’s chock full of Christmas-y images like the ones above. So, so gorgeous. (And this isn’t even a sponsored post! I did say I had an obsession, right? ;))

Want to be a part of the fifth annual Scandinavian Christmas series? Email me at oaxacaborn@gmail.com with a URL, guest post, photo, Pinterest board, or anything else relating to Scandinavian and Nordic holiday traditions. Stay tuned for more Skandinavisk jul!

Christmas

CHRISTMAS :: 5th Annual Scandinavian and Nordic Christmas Series

5th Annual Scandinavian and Nordic Christmas series on the oaxacaborn.com blog

For the fifth straight year (wow!) I’ll be bringing you Scandi Christmas gorgeousness during the entire Advent season. According to the feedback you’ve shared with me over the years (and the number of times you’ve pinned the content on to Pinterest) this is your absolute favorite series. Together, we’ll be talking adventskalender, sharing interiors cozied up for the season, exploring different ways to decorate, celebrating Scandinavian and Nordic traditions, and more.

As in previous years, you’re invited to join the celebration. If you have a favorite post you’ve written, a link to a particularly Scandinavian store, a set of photos, a memory of Nordic holiday traditions, a Pinterest board full of Scandi images, or simply want to share the URL of your blog (point me to the category with the most Christmas-y content), email me! In previous years,  contributors have been from the U.S., Finland, Sweden, the United Kingdom — even far above the Arctic circle — but you’re of course welcome to participate no matter where you live. I can’t wait to hear from you!

P.S. The series will begin on 1 November and continue through 25 December. Hyvää Joulua! God Jul!