Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: DIY Felt Play Food Tutorial – Lussekatter for St. Lucia’s Day

A few years ago, Scandinavian-American blogger Linnea wrote a lovely overview of the Swedish holiday known as St. Lucia Day, and she’s back today with a tutorial for the most darling little felt lussekatter (Swedish saffron bun) toys!  When Aveline was the same age as Linnea’s adorable little, projects like this were very popular in our house. The supplies needed are so minimal — felt, needle and thread, polyfill — but just look at how captivated babies are with the final product! Beyond cute. 

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter

DIY Felt Play Food Tutorial – Lussekatter for St. Lucia’s Day

by Linnea Farnsworth

I’m so excited to have had a little girl of my own to be a Lucia in our home! I’ve always thought that felt play food is so darling and fun, so this year I made some felt Lucia buns for her to play with.

I got a few sheets of the golden felt at Michaels, it is a perfect color. Other things you need are thread, embroidery floss in a matching color, and some batting to stuff the insides. If your Lucia is older you could put some dark beads or buttons on to be raisins (they are a bit of a choking hazard for my little Lucia, though!)

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Start with a piece 3″x9″. My felt sheets were 9″x12″, so I could get 4 buns from each sheet.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Fold the piece in half and pin. Sew along the long edge and one short edge, leaving a 3/8″ seam allowance.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Clip the corner – this make it easier to flip the corner right side out again.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Turn your tube right side out and stuff it. You want it to be stuffed firmly, but not overstuffed – it needs to have some give so we can roll up the edges.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Stitch the open end closed.

Now we are going to roll the felt much like we would the dough in real life. I found it easiest to roll down the edge just a little first, and anchor that with a few stitches. Here I used 3 strands of embroidery floss because it was a bit stronger and required less stitches.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

After that is secured, roll it down a little further and anchor with a few more stitches.

DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog

Do the same to the other side, only roll it the opposite direction for a traditionally shaped Lucia bun.

Sew on any buttons or beads for raisins if you are adding them, and you’re done! If you’d like you can experiment and make other fancy shapes with your Lucia “dough.”

Glad Lucia!
DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog
DIY Felt Food Tutorial for Swedish Lussekatter, by Linnea Farnsworth for the Oaxacaborn blog


Linnea Farnsworth is a self-described Scandihoovian, a Washington DC-area photographer, and mom to the cutest little sweet pea. Linnea has also shared previously about her Swedish heritage on both the Scandinavian Christmas and Midsommar blog series — Sankta Lucia Day and Linnea’s Swedish Midsommar Celebration. (She really throws the best mid-summer parties, you guys.) Don’t forget to follow her on Instagram at @linneaanne!

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Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: Dalahäst, Dala Horse

Ah, dalahästar (that’s the plural of dalahäst…I think).  I love them. Is it cliche? I don’t even care!  : )

Giant OUtdoor Dala
Dala horses in the snow (perhaps at Skansen Park?) via Hasenohr on Flickr

Cross stitch Dala
Cross Stitch Dala via Kitschn Stitchin

Dala Horse print
Dala Horse Print via Red Stuga on Etsy (based in Minneapolis; where else?!)

SONY DSC
“How Swede It Is” Dala Horse and Kanelbullar Magnets via Red Stuga

paper mache dala horses
Papier Mâché Dala Horses via Posh Chicago

HenningTrollbäck
Henning Trollbäck’s Dala Horse Poster via Fine Little Day

Dala Zoo
Dala Zoo (Giraffe and Moose) via Hildas Hem

Chalk Dala
Chalk Drawing of Dala Horse via Dirtsas Studio on Etsy

tillverkning
Dalahäst-tillverkning (Dala Horse Manufacturer/Factory) Sign Liz Highleyman on Flickr

Copper_Dala_Horse
Copper Dala Horse via Fischer Fine Arts on Etsy

via Oaxacaborn on Instagram
A Dala horse vignette in my home.

Want to decorate a Dala horse — or maybe introduce your kids to this creature? Here’s a great FREE printable Dala horse template from Make Learning Fun! You might also be interested in this video of how Dala horses are made, or last year’s Dala horse round-up.

God Jul!

Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: Nordingården

The Swedish blog Nordingården blog is an absolute treasure trove!

Nyårkök1

JUl på Nordingården-1020

FB-spis

Nya bilder 8232

adventsmys18

jul i köket4

A picture really is worth a thousand words — I can’t understand the words, but my goodness! Nordingården is a wonderland. There are SO many more lovely images; I hope you’ll check it out!

P.S. Did anyone notice the first and last photos are the same room?

Christmas

SCANDINAVIAN CHRISTMAS :: Your Chance to be Featured on the Fourth Annual Blog Series!

Scandinavian_Christmas_Oaxacaborn_2014

It’s that time again. For the fourth year in a row, Oaxacaborn will soon be transformed into a Scandinavian winter wonderland — and I can’t wait!

Here are a just a few highlights from the last few years.

Of course, none of this would be possible without YOU, my incredible world-wide readers. So, what do you have for us all this year? Email me at oaxacaborn@gmail.com!

(Still need ideas? You can read more about what sort of Scandinavian/Nordic Christmas topics to submit, or click here to see the entire Scandinavian Christmas archive.)

Scandinavian Summer

What is Midsommar, Noc Kupały, and Juhannus?

midsommar midsommarafton via mokkasin
Image Credit: Midsommarafton [midsummer] via Mokkasin

One midsummer when I was probably eleven or so, I remember spending the weekend at my great-grandparents’ lakeside cabin in Upper Michigan. The scenery everywhere up there looks exactly like this, even though these photos are from Finland, and not Michigan. Fascinating, isn’t it, considering how many Nordic immigrants settled in the Upper Peninsula?

Brett Seward
Image Credit: Sweden in summer by Brett Seward

That weekend, in between carving my name in the paper-white bark of birch trees, eating sour wild strawberries and floating in the cold lake, I remember the Finnish-language program Suomi Kutsuu playing on the little living room TV, showing what seemed like endless footage of a bonfire slowly burning in the middle of the lake. I didn’t put two and two together then — I wasn’t what you’d call an observant child — but I was at my great-grandparents’ place over Juhannus!  Although you might not know Juhannus by name, you probably know Swedish midsommar, and you most certainly know summer solstice.

Midsommar crown
Image Credit: Crown by Mendocino Floral Design via Style Me Pretty

In the northern US states of Michigan or Minnesota, both around latitude 46° N, the summer solstice marks a magically late sunset — no wonder I didn’t get much sleep that weekend! Can you imagine midsummer’s eve in Stockholm or Helsinki, at 60° N? Incredible, the daylight must stretch on forever! [As a comparison, Orlando is at 28.4° N, and Oaxaca, where I was born, is even further down at 16.9° N)

Midsummer traditions vary among different Northern European countries, but my favorites are the lake bonfires, or kokko, of Finnish Juhannus, the floral crowns of Swedish Midsommar, and the glittering floating lanterns of Poland’s Noc Kupały.

Although a sky full of lanterns or a water’s edge bonfire might be a bit hard to pull off where you live, you can still celebrate midsommar. Do you have plans this weekend? Maybe you’ll celebrate with a maypole and a Swedish smörgåsbord (pickled herring and dill potatoes!), or maybe you’ll gather flowers and make a pretty floral crown.

Or, maybe, your nod to the summer solstice will simply be tossing and turning, wishing you’d purchased blackout drapes. ;)

However you celebrate, god midsommar!