Homeschooling

Nurturing Child-Led Passions in Gifted Kids with Supplemental Science and Technology Homeschool Curriculum

Nurturing Child-Led Passions in Gifted Kids with Supplemental Science and Technology Homeschool CurriculumOne of the questions I am asked most often in connection with nurturing gifted learning is as follows: “How do you structure your days? How do you balance child-led learning and formal instruction?”

First of all, it’s not an either-or dichotomy. You don’t have to choose between one and the other. Structured academics and child-directed exploration are not mutually exclusive. Free play and formal lessons can co-exist in harmony within the same homeschool — and yes, even within the same day.

How to Structure Your Homeschool Day to Balance Child-Led Learning with Formal Lessons

I’m a second-generation homeschooler.  My brothers and I were all (excellently) educated at home from preschool right on through high school. Our days as kids were set up in much the same way I set up my own homeschool days today, in two distinct yet complementary tiers.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I was compensated for my time in exchange for writing and publishing this post. All opinions are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. This post contains affiliate links. This means if you click on a Homeschool Buyers Co-op link and make a purchase, I will receive a small commission. 

Continue reading “Nurturing Child-Led Passions in Gifted Kids with Supplemental Science and Technology Homeschool Curriculum”

Homeschooling

In Defense of Fidget Spinners: How Movement Can Help Kids Who Are Wired Differently

In Defense of Fidget Spinners

There is a lot of social media furor right now about fidget spinners. In many of these posts, people talk about how stupid fidget spinners are, and brag about how glad they are they don’t need a gadget to focus. One blog post even went so far as compare fidget spinners with the fall of civilization, and called for anyone needing special accommodations such as physical movement to “overcome this need”. (Would the author feel the same way about glasses, hearing aids, or wheelchairs? I scarcely want to ask.)

The reality is, not all learners are wired the same way. Not all students fit into a neat and tidy box of expectations. Not all students are best served by sitting at a desk. In fact, when some children are required to remain motionless in order to learn, the child’s entire capacity for focus is spent on the enormous task of sitting still, and there’s very little left over to actually absorb the information being presented.

Continue reading “In Defense of Fidget Spinners: How Movement Can Help Kids Who Are Wired Differently”